TENNESSE SCHOOL TO PRISON PIPELINE LINES THE POCKETS OF RACISTS

THE PROBLEM WITH THIS UGLY HORROR STORY IS THAT THE WRITER WROTE ABOUT IT WITHOUT CONDEMING THE ACTIONS OF THE RACIST WHO NOT ONLY CREATED THE PIPELINE BUT PROVIDED BLACK CHILDREN TO SEND THROUGH THE PIPELINE STRAIGHT TO THE PRISON FACILITIES THEY BUILT. THESE ILLITERATE COUNTRY BUMPKIN SAVAGES WERE GIVEN PERMISSION TO ABUSE CHILDRENS BLACK BODIES UNDER THE COLOR OF LAW AND GOVERNMENT INTERVENTION. FROM THE POLICE TO THE JUDICAL DEPT MENTIONED IN THIS HORROR STORY TWO THINGS ARE CLEAR. THE WHITEMAN AND WHITEWOMAN ARE DEVILS TO BLACK CHILDREN. THE REALITY BLACK PEOPLE HAVE TO ACCEPT THAT THE WHITEMAN AND WOMAN HAVE ALWAYS WORKED AS A TEAM TO UNDERMINE, CRIMINALIZE AND DEGRADE BLACK PEOPLE FROM THE CRADLE TO THE GRAVE. TO THE DOCTOR AND HIS NURSE. TO THE TEAHER AND HER PRINCIPLE. TO THE COP TO THE JUDGE THEY WORK IN TANDEM ON EVERY LEVEL TO IMPRISON AND KILL US WHETHER WE WERE YOUNG OR OLD. READ THIS HORROR STORY AND UNDERSTAND THE WHITE MAN AND WOMAN BEING DEVILS IN THE FLESH OF THEIR BEING IS NOT HYPERBOLE....ITS ACTUAL FACT!


The judge who jailed Black children for a crime that doesn’t exist

Meribah Knight


Chapter 1: "What in the World?"


Friday, April 15, 2016: Hobgood Elementary School, Murfreesboro, Tennessee

Three police officers were crowded into the assistant principal's office at Hobgood Elementary School, and Tammy Garrett, the school's principal, had no idea what to do. One officer, wearing a tactical vest, was telling her: Go get the kids. A second officer was telling her: Don't go get the kids. The third officer wasn't saying anything.


Garrett knew the police had been sent to arrest some children, although exactly which children, it would turn out, was unclear to everyone, even to these officers. The names police had given the principal included four girls, now sitting in classrooms throughout the school. All four girls were Black. There was a sixth grader, two fourth graders and a third grader. The youngest was 8. On this sunny Friday afternoon in spring, she wore her hair in pigtails.


A few weeks before, a video had appeared on YouTube. It showed two small boys, 5 and 6 years old, throwing feeble punches at a larger boy as he walked away, while other kids tagged along, some yelling. The scuffle took place off school grounds, after a game of pickup basketball. One kid insulted another kid's mother, is what started it all.


The police were at Hobgood because of that video. But they hadn't come for the boys who threw punches. They were here for the children who looked on. The police in Murfreesboro, a fast-growing city about 30 miles southeast of Nashville, had secured juvenile petitions for 10 children in all who were accused of failing to stop the fight. Officers were now rounding up kids, even though the department couldn't identify a single one in the video, which was posted with a filter that made faces fuzzy. What was clear were the voices, including that of one girl trying to break up the fight, saying: "Stop, Tay-Tay. Stop, Tay-Tay. Stop, Tay-Tay." She was a fourth grader at Hobgood. Her initials were E.J.


The confusion at Hobgood — one officer saying this, another saying that — could be traced in part to absence. A police officer regularly assigned to Hobgood, who knew the students and staff, had bailed that morning after learning about the planned arrests. The thought of arresting these children caused him such stress that he feared he might cry in front of them. Or have a heart attack. He wanted nothing to do with it, so he complained of chest pains and went home, with no warning to his fill-in about what was in store.


Also absent was the police officer who had investigated the video and instigated these arrests, Chrystal Templeton. She had assured the principal she would be there. She had also told Garrett there would be no handcuffs, that police would be discreet. But Templeton was a no-show. Garrett even texted her — "How's timing?" — but got no answer.


Instead of going to Hobgood, Templeton had spent the afternoon gathering the petitions, then heading to the Rutherford County Juvenile Detention Center, a two-tiered jail for children with dozens of surveillance cameras, 48 cells and 64 beds. There, she waited for the kids to be brought to her.


In Rutherford County, a juvenile court judge had been directing police on what she called "our process" for arresting children, and she appointed the jailer, who employed a "filter system" to determine which children to hold.


The judge was proud of what she had helped build, despite some alarming numbers buried in state reports.


Among cases referred to juvenile court, the statewide average for how often children were locked up was 5%.


In Rutherford County, it was 48%.


In the assistant principal's office at Hobgood, the officer telling Garrett not to get the kids was Chris Williams. Williams, who is Black, had been a Murfreesboro cop for five years. "What in the world?" he thought, when he learned what these arrests were about. At Hobgood, two-thirds of the students were Black or Latino. Williams wondered if such arrests would be made at a school that was mostly white. He had a daughter who was 9. He pictured her being arrested. This is going to blow up, he thought; I'm going to end up in federal court over this. He considered quitting, but instead tried to get someone to intervene. Tucked in an office corner, he called a sergeant, a lieutenant and a major, but couldn't find anyone to call it off.


The officer not saying anything was Albert Miles III. Growing up, Miles, who is Black, had friends who hated the police. But Miles' dad was a cop. Miles wanted to prove that police could be trusted. That afternoon, Miles had been pulled out of roll call along with another officer; a sergeant told the two to go arrest some kids at Hobgood. The sergeant didn't say why, but at Hobgood, Miles started picking up details. Miles, too, wondered if these arrests would happen at a school full of white students.


The third officer at Hobgood was Jeff Carroll. He'd been pulled out of roll call with Miles. Carroll, who is white, was a patrol officer and SWAT team member. In evaluations, supervisors praised him as a leader, "cool under pressure." Carroll also had no idea what these arrests were about. But his sergeant had ordered them, and he followed orders. Carroll was the officer telling the principal: Go get the kids.


Garrett asked if she could call their parents first. Carroll told her no. Garrett told the police that one girl had diabetes and got treatment when she arrived home after school. Please, the principal said. Let me call her parent. On this, the police ultimately compromised, saying the girl could get a shot in the nurse's office before being taken to the jail.


Of the two officers telling Garrett what to do — get the kids, don't get the kids — Carroll seemed the more aggressive, the principal would say later. She agreed to get the kids.


Having these arrests take place at Hobgood was not something school officials wanted. They wanted kids to feel safe at school. Garrett grew up poor. Nine-tenths of her students were poor. Years before, Hobgood had struggled academically. Now it was a celebrated success. Garrett and her staff had worked to build trust with parents, with students. "I don't give up on kids," Garrett says. But she knew that trust is fragile, and trauma endures.


As Garrett gathered the girls from their classrooms, she believed the police would at least avoid a spectacle. School let out at 2:30. That was minutes away. Garrett's understanding was that the police would keep the girls in the office until school was dismissed and everyone else was gone.


Garrett rounded up the sixth grader, a tall girl with braids who had visions of becoming a police officer; one of the fourth graders, the girl with diabetes; and the 8-year-old third grader. In the hallway, the principal tried to prepare them, saying the police were there regarding a video of a fight. Hearing this, the sixth grader told Garrett that the two other girls hadn't even been there.


After returning to the office with the three girls, Garrett relayed to police what the sixth grader had told her.


Her words were barely out when Carroll made it clear he'd had enough, Garrett said later when interviewed as part of an internal police investigation.


Carroll pulled out handcuffs and put them "right in my face," Garrett recalled.


"And he said, 'We're going now, we're going now, there's no more talk, and we're going now.'


"And I said, 'But, but, but.'"


Carroll yelled at her, Garrett said. She felt intimidated. Bullied. She worried that if she said any more, she might be arrested herself. "And so I backed off."


By now the girls were crying and screaming and reaching for the principal, who was also crying, as was the assistant principal. "And it was, it was, it was awful," Garrett later said.


Carroll handcuffed the sixth grader. Later, asked why, he said because policy allowed him to. After being handcuffed, the sixth grader fell to her knees.


Miles handcuffed the 8-year-old with pigtails. "Just acting out of habit," he said later. Walking to a patrol car, Miles stopped and thought, "Wait a minute," and removed the cuffs. "I guess my brain finally caught up with what was going on."


While Carroll drove those two girls to the jail, the fourth grader with diabetes stayed behind to see the nurse. She was sisters with the sixth grader; her initials were C.C.


In all this back and forth, Principal Garrett realized something. The other fourth grader. She had forgotten about her. And now, school was out. The girl had boarded her bus, and was waiting to go home.


The other fourth grader was E.J. Although she'd said "stop," she was on the police's list to be picked up for encouraging the fight.


Go get her, the police told Garrett.


Garrett was still crying. She didn't want to go out to the line of buses and let all those kids see her like that. But she went, feeling she had little choice.


A teacher beckoned E.J. off the bus. Then Garrett escorted her inside, to the awaiting police. E.J., scared and confused, begged for her mother — and threw up on the floor.


The two fourth graders still at Hobgood, E.J. and C.C., were best friends. Williams and Miles walked the girls outside, not handcuffing either. With some parents joining in, the officers formed a prayer circle around the two girls. Miles prayed out loud for the kids to be protected and for God to bring peace and understanding. Then he buckled the fourth graders into a patrol car and drove off. On the way to jail the girls cried, "snot and all," E.J. would say later. Garrett, meanwhile, pulled out her personal cellphone and began calling parents, no longer willing to do as the police commanded.


For the officers, the confusion didn't end at the school. It continued once the children began arriving at the jail.


When Carroll walked in with the first two girls, Templeton, the investigating officer, pointed to the 8-year-old and asked what she was doing there. The police had no petition for her, Templeton said. The 8-year-old's mother soon arrived and took her child home.


Miles brought in the last two girls, the two fourth graders. Then, walking out to his patrol car, he ran into an angry parent, Miles would recall later. It was a father demanding answers. Miles dropped his head, shaking it. The father asked why this was happening. I don't know, Miles answered. We are good people, the father said. I can only imagine what you're feeling, Miles answered. He explained, briefly, the juvenile court process. This is wrong, the father told Miles, over and over. After the third time, Miles, fighting back tears, said he understood, as a parent himself, the father's anger and pain.


Fuck you, the father said.


I understand, Miles answered.


Only later, when he returned to the police station, did Miles allow himself to cry.


​​When the parent asked why this was happening, Miles had been unable to say. But the answer traces to individual missteps and institutional breakdowns — all on a grand scale.


What happened on that Friday and in the days after, when police rounded up even more kids, would expose an ugly and unsettling culture in Rutherford County, one spanning decades. In the wake of these mass arrests, lawyers would see inside a secretive legal system that's supposed to protect kids, but in this county did the opposite. Officials flouted the law by wrongfully arresting and jailing children. One of their worst practices was stopped following the events at Hobgood, but the conditions that allowed the lawlessness remain. The adults in charge failed. Yet they're still in charge. Tennessee's systems for protecting children failed. Yet they haven't been fixed.


Chapter 2: "The Mother of the County"


Eleven children in all were arrested over the video, including the 8-year-old taken in by mistake. Media picked up the story. Parents and community leaders condemned the actions of police. "Unimaginable, unfathomable," a Nashville pastor said. "Unconscionable," "inexcusable," "insane," three state legislators said. But Rutherford County's juvenile court judge focused instead on the state of youth, telling a local TV station: "We are in a crisis with our children in Rutherford County. ... I've never seen it this bad."


Rutherford County established the position of elected juvenile court judge in 2000, and ever since, Donna Scott Davenport has been the job's only holder. She sometimes calls herself the "mother of the county."


Davenport runs the juvenile justice system, appointing magistrates, setting rules and presiding over cases that include everything from children accused of breaking the law to parents accused of neglecting their children. While the county's mayor, sheriff and commissioners have turned over, she has stayed on, becoming a looming figure for thousands of families. "She's been the judge ever since I was a kid," said one mother whose own kids have cycled through Davenport's courtroom. One man, now in his late 20s, said that when he was a kid in trouble, he would pray for a magistrate instead of Davenport: "If she's having a bad day, most definitely, you're going to have a bad day."


While juvenile court is mostly private, Davenport keeps a highly public profile. For the past 10 years she's had a monthly radio segment on WGNS, a local station where she talks about her work.


She sees a breakdown in morals. Children lack respect: "It's worse now than I've ever seen it," she said in 2012. Parents don't parent: "It's just the worst I've ever seen," she said in 2017. On WGNS, Davenport reminisces with the show's host about a time when families ate dinner together and parents always knew where their children were and what friends they were with because kids called home from a landline, not some could-be-anywhere cellphone. Video games, the internet, social media — it's all poison for children, the judge says.


Davenport describes her work as a calling. "I'm here on a mission. It's not a job. It's God's mission," she told a local newspaper. The children in her courtroom aren't hers, but she calls them hers. "I'm seeing a lot of aggression in my 9- and 10-year-olds," she says in one radio segment.


She encourages parents troubled by their children's behavior to use over-the-counter kits to test them for drugs. "Don't buy them at the Dollar Tree," she says on the radio. "The best ones are your reputable drugstores."


Scrutinizing the inner workings of Tennessee's juvenile courts can be difficult. Court files are mostly off-limits; proceedings can be closed at a judge's discretion. But on the radio, Davenport provides listeners a glimpse of the court's work. "I've locked up one 7-year-old in 13 years, and that was a heartbreak," she said in 2012. "But 8- and 9-year-olds, and older, are very common now."


Davenport has lots of favorite sayings. "God don't make no junk," she says to kids, to instill self-worth. To instill fear, she will say, "I'm going to let you be young and dumb — one time." There's no jury in juvenile court, so Davenport decides the facts as well as the law. "And that is why I should get 12 times the pay," she likes to joke.


Davenport enforces a strict dress code in her courtroom, requiring people to "show deference." There will be no untucked shirts. No sundresses, spaghetti straps or spandex. No body piercings, no uncovered tattoos. Pants shall be pulled up, and if a child shows up without a belt, the judge keeps a bag of them, and if she runs out, "you'll just have to make do with a piece of rope," one newspaper profile said.


Davenport says children need consequences. "Being detained in our facility is not a picnic at all," she says on the radio. "It's not supposed to be. It's a consequence for an action."


Davenport's tough talk — and the county's high detention rate — go against a reform movement that started about the same time she went on the bench. Beginning in the late 1990s, the number of kids in lockup began to decline, both nationally and in Tennessee.


Davenport, now 69, grew up in Mt. Juliet, a Nashville suburb. She attended Middle Tennessee State University, in Murfreesboro, majoring in criminal justice.


On the radio, Davenport says she has been "blessed" with an extensive history in law enforcement: "I was trained well in 17 years by different law enforcement agencies." As a juvenile court judge, she says, she can spot "subtle signs" of gang activity, "wearing something to the right or to the left, or a color here or a color there."


Her description of her job history doesn't always match employment records.


Davenport, in a sworn deposition, said her law enforcement career began in 1977 at MTSU, where, as a student, she worked full time as a university police officer for two to three years. But her MTSU personnel file shows her being a part-time dispatcher, then a full-time clerk-typist, then a full-time secretary.


In 1980, Davenport started as a dispatcher for the Murfreesboro Police Department. Then she took another job — not in law enforcement, but in the law department for Nashville, investigating financial claims that might include anything from car accidents to slip-and-falls.


At night, Davenport went to law school. She graduated in 1986. That same year, she told lawyers in a deposition, "I started with the feds." She told radio listeners that for eight years she was "with the U.S. Justice Department, where I analyzed and tracked and helped identify serial killers." But this job wasn't with the Justice Department. Her employer, Regional Information Sharing Systems, received federal funding but isn't a federal agency.


She then became a private investigator, handling "mostly divorces," she told lawyers.


In a deposition, Davenport said she first took the bar exam about a year after finishing law school. She failed, then kept trying.


"How — how many times have you taken the bar?" an attorney asked her.


"I passed on the fifth time," she said.


She was admitted to practice law in 1995, nine years after getting her law degree.


In 1998, she became a juvenile court referee, akin to a judge. One of the county's judges appointed her. (Asked why, he recently said, "I really can't go back and tell you.")


The following year, Rutherford County violated federal law 191 times by keeping kids locked up too long, according to a story later published by The Tennessean. By law, children held for such minor acts as truancy were to appear before a judge within 24 hours and be released no more than a day after that. The newspaper interviewed Davenport, who estimated half those violations occurred because a kid had cursed her or someone else. For cursing, she said, she typically sentenced kids to two to 10 days in jail. "Was I in violation?" she said. "Heck, yes. But am I going to allow a child to cuss anyone out? Heck, no."


In August 2000 — less than three months after the story was published — Rutherford County elected Davenport to the newly created job of juvenile court judge. Her opponent, a major in the sheriff's department, was later charged with sex crimes against minors and, in a plea deal, got probation. Davenport has not had another opponent since.


With juveniles, police in Tennessee typically avoid cuffs and custody, particularly in less serious cases. They instead serve summonses instructing kids and their parents to show up in court.


But that wasn't the routine in Rutherford County. When the Murfreesboro officers arrested the kids at Hobgood, they were following Davenport's "process": arrest, transport to the detention center for screening, then file charging papers. "IT IS SO ORDERED," Davenport wrote in a 2003 memo about her instructions. Four years later she declared that even kids accused of minor violations like truancy must be taken into custody and transported to jail.


Davenport once told Murfreesboro's Daily News Journal: "I know I'm harsh, I'm very harsh. I like to think I'm fair, but I'm tough."


In 2016, the Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded Davenport. In a family law matter, a father's lawyers had asked to move his case to another county. By law, they were allowed to. But Davenport called "the father and/or his attorneys" a "sneaky snake," the reprimand said. What's more, she ordered that a transcript of her words be forwarded, possibly tipping the next judge to her animosity. The reprimand found that Davenport's "intemperate conduct" threatened the right to a fair hearing.


In some other cases, appeals courts have taken Davenport to task through unusually blunt language.


In one, Davenport was overturned twice. Davenport, finding that a mother had neglected her daughter, granted custody to another couple. Two higher courts disagreed and ordered Davenport to reunify the mother and child. Instead, Davenport terminated the mother's parental rights. The other couple then adopted the girl, after being "exhorted" by Davenport to move quickly, according to a state Court of Appeals opinion.


The adoption went through while a challenge to Davenport's parental termination ruling was still pending. In the second go-round, a state appeals court judge made clear his displeasure, saying, during oral argument, "Our little system works pretty simply": If a higher court tells a lower court to do something, the lower court does it. "That didn't happen in this case," he said. Two months later, the appeals court overruled Davenport for a second time. Saying it was "troubled by the proceedings to this point," the court ordered Davenport to reunite the mother and child — "expeditiously."


Davenport, through a spokesperson, declined our interview request, to which we attached 13 pages of questions. Previously, when asked about the county's arrest practices, Davenport told lawyers that she "can't tell law enforcement what to do." She told a local newspaper that her court produces "a lot of success stories." She told radio listeners, "I want the children that come in front of me to leave better than they came in."


Chapter 3: "Yeah, That's the Charge"


Friday, April 15, 2016: Judicial Commissioners' office, Murfreesboro, Tennessee


On the same Friday afternoon as three police officers jammed into the assistant principal's office at Hobgood Elementary School, three other people huddled in another office a few miles away, to discuss what charge these kids could face.


Chrystal Templeton, the police officer investigating the video, wanted to arrest every kid who watched the fight and "get them all in front" of Davenport, she would say later during an internal police investigation. Charging them was helping them, Templeton believed, because "juvenile court is about rehabilitation."


Templeton thought an appropriate charge might be conspiracy to commit assault. But then she met with Amy Anderson and Sherry Hamlett, two judicial commissioners authorized by Rutherford County to issue arrest warrants. Anderson told Templeton that she thought the only child who could be charged with conspiring was the kid who recorded video of the fight on a cellphone.


So they went in search of another charge, with Hamlett checking the state's criminal code on a computer.


Templeton had joined the Murfreesboro Police Department in 1998, when she was 21. By the time of the arrests at Hobgood, she had been disciplined at least 37 times, including nine suspensions. She once left a loaded pistol on the seat of a patrol car, according to her personnel file. During a pursuit, she failed to turn on her dash cam. Another time she lost control of her patrol car and hit a Ford Explorer, which, in turn, hit a Nissan Pathfinder while Templeton's patrol unit, spinning, smacked a Toyota Sequoia. In all, four cars were damaged and seven people injured, including Templeton.